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Purely Shutters > Home > Blog > Garden > Tips for creating a colourful autumn garden

Tips for creating a colourful autumn garden

With the leaves beginning to change colour, autumn is arguably the most beautiful time of year.

Unfortunately however, it doesn’t last long and the next stage is cold winter days, bare trees and a distinct lack of vibrant colours in the garden. All is not lost however as even in the winter you can add colour and vibrancy to your garden. For some great top tips visit David Domoney website and read his article: https://www.daviddomoney.com/the-21-best-plants-for-winter-garden-colour/#.W8YN3y2ZP-Y.

Here’s our low down on winter colour in and around your home and garden.

Chrysanthemums

Chrysanthemums can now be bought in full flower which means you can simply place them in your garden for instant colour. Bear in mind that they cannot survive the winter months and the first proper frost will kill them off. Bring them inside to an unheated conservatory or enclosed porch however and they will continue to flower for a few more weeks.

Blooming pansies shutterstock_1097903774

You can buy a variety of pansies and violas already in flower during the autumn months and the great news is that they’re tough enough to survive the cold temperatures. Winter-flowering pansies will keep blooming until late spring (with only short breaks if there’s a very cold spell) which means you can ensure your garden looks great even during the most miserable time of year.

Flowering heathers

One of the UK’s most famous gardeners, Alan Titchmarsh particularly loves flowering heathers during the colder months. He says:

“These are my top choice as they handle bad weather well and have a long flowering season, from November to March. They come in various colours including white, pink, mauve and purple, while varieties with orange or golden foliage are also available. Winter heathers team well with evergreen shrubs, including berrying kinds.”

Ornamental greens

Decorative greens continue to grow in popularity at this time of year because while everything else in the garden is dying, they provide some much-needed life and colour. At this time of year, the central leaves begin to change colour, turning either purple or creamy white.

Because their leaves are tougher than the delicate petals of flowers, they last the duration of winter and even hold their colour despite the cold and rain. Unless it’s very severe, even frost won’t do them any harm.

Although the likes of ornamental cabbage and kale look and grow very much like their edible counterparts, because they’re not as tasty or tender, they’re typically grown for their looks rather than their flavor.

Evergreen perennials shutterstock_610104572

Compact and trailing perennials can be used for winter pot displays when teamed up with evergreen or semi-evergreen foliage. Heuchera, lamium and hardy ferns all work well and displays like this look particularly great in window boxes.

Attached on or just below the sill of a window, these boxes not only help to add colour during the autumn and winter months, they also help to make the most of attractive features such as our window shutters.

 

When potting plants at this time of year, remember to choose containers that won’t crack in freezing weather. By lining them with hessian or a similar material to lag the inside, this will also help to prevent compost freezing. Don’t forget to make sure there are plenty of drainage holes in the base as to much water can cause problems during the winter months.

For more ideas when it comes to creating a colourful autumn garden, visit The Telegraph Gardening pages here: https://www.telegraph.co.uk/gardening/how-to-grow/top-25-autumn-plants/

 

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